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Ten respondents to Toronto/GTA compost RFP

The chance to capture a share of 360,000 tonnes per year of foodscrap processing has attracted a total of ten bids...


The chance to capture a share of 360,000 tonnes per year of foodscrap processing has attracted a total of ten bids to a recent Toronto, York and Durham (GTA area) compost processing Request for Proposal (RFP).

Among the expected responders and presumed technologies are:

1. All Treat Farms (Arthur, Ontario) – Tarp-covered aerated windrows;
2. Conporec (Tracy, Quebec) – Rotating drum;
3. Halton Recycling (Newmarket Ontario) – Recent purchasers of the Canada Composting Inc. (CCI) Anaerobic digester (AD);
4. International BioRecovery (IBR) (Vancouver, B.C.) – Aerobic digestion;
5. Miller Waste (Markham, Ontario) – Ebara or an unknown AD technology or both.

Among the unexpected respondents are:
6. K.C. Environmental, also known a Cleanit Greenit (Edmonton, Alberta) – Static piles;
7. Conestoga Rover – Consultant;
8. Curtis Auto Wreckers (also known as Ontario Disposal) (Durham, Ontario) – Windrows.

Finally there are two less well known bidders:
1. Greey CTS (Toronto, Ontario) – Financier;
2. SGC Resource Recovery.

Two proponents, IBR and SGC are prepared to take over operation and/or the space occupied by the City of Toronto and CCI AD facility on Vanley Crescent in North York.
The other eight submitted proposals to process at other locations. Greey CTS submitted proposals for both alternatives.

Toronto has predicted 160,000 tonnes/year of foodscrap generation, York 60,000 tonnes and Durham 40,000. (Peel Region (60,000) was orginally part of the process but dropped out when it decided on the Herhof containerized system currently in use in Peel. (See article in the upcoming Arpil/May edition of Solid Waste & Recycling magazine.)

It appears that neither Waste Management of Canada, BFI or IMS submitted proposals, nor did Nor Gro-bark or Omega. Also absent were containerized systems (e.g., Green Mountain Technologies/Engineered Composting Technogies) or channel-style (e.g., Guelph wet/dry).

Source: Rod Muir


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