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Judge renders decision for the plaintiff in Waxman case

On June 27, 2002, a Superior Court of Ontario judge rendered her decision in Waxman vs. Waxman -- one of Canada's l...


On June 27, 2002, a Superior Court of Ontario judge rendered her decision in Waxman vs. Waxman — one of Canada’s longest running civil lawsuits involving Canada’s most prominent recycling family business. In 1988, when Morris Laxman sued his brother Chester, he initiated 15 years of litigation. The judge ruled that Chester duped his older brother Morris out of their father’s empire, getting him to sell his half of the company just before open-heart surgery.

Madame Justice Mary Anne Sanderson’s 440-page ruling reinstates the two brothers as co-owners of the Hamilton, Ontario-based I. Waxman & Sons Ltd. The scrap company — which was started by their father in the 1940s and taken over by the brothers in 1972 — is expected to take in $50-million in revenues this year. The ruling also orders Chester and his family to turn over $40-million to Morris, as well as possibly precious art and racehorses.

The trial revealed the roles of the warring sons of Morris and Chester in the matter and also provided insight into the early days of Hamilton-based Philip Services Corp., at one time North America’s largest scrap company. Philip’s lawsuit against Chester’s son Robert for $150-million is still before the courts.

For more information, see the article "Family Scrap" in the October/November 2001 edition, and the August/September 2002 edition for further coverage, or call Guy Crittenden at 416-442-2202


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