Solid Waste & Recycling

Product

Facility in a box


HARTFORD, Connecticut – Ecogensus’s flagship system, the EGS-5000L, has exceeded key performance metrics. Debuted last year, Ecogensus’ ruggedized system is designed for transport in standard shipping containers and deployment in waste facilities, where it thermally treats waste and converts it to a high-energy fuel.

The EGS-5000L incorporates Ecogensus’ dual-shell process vessel that uses an efficient heated processor within a near-vacuum outer vessel. Capable of processing municipal solid waste, the EGS-5000L both treats the waste and diverts it from landfill.

“The time to finally modernize the world’s waste management infrastructure is here,” said CEO and CTO Bjørnulf Østvik. “We are committed to making the world safer and cleaner with technology solutions that put an end to archaic landfilling.”

Ecogensus reports that the energy efficiency savings have been primarily observed in the electric powertrain. Energy usage figures from operations are coming in 45.9% to 53.04% lower than last year’s estimates, which were based on an earlier model of the system.

“We are very pleased with the performance data we’re seeing,” said Østvik. “This development further boosts our position as the world leader in advanced waste processing technologies.”

The EGS-5000L was unveiled last year as a new feat in engineering – incorporating a processor complete with the Balance-of-Plant, including all major components and sub-systems, built into a transportable two-skid enclosed system.

Often referred to as a “facility in a box”, the system is designed to withstand harsh conditions, overseas transport in shipping containers and handling by rigging equipment – without affecting sensitive electronics and instrumentation. Ecogensus successfully met these criteria yet also excelled in efficiency measures.

“The robust processing capacity and energy efficiency of the EGS-5000L represents a significant achievement that far exceeds our published specifications and performance expectations,” said senior systems and controls engineer Michael Lukas, Ph.D.


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