Solid Waste & Recycling

Feature

Wheel of Fortune (October 01, 2001)

How to select the right compactor wheel for your landfillEver since the solid waste industry began using mobile landfill compactors to push, spread and compact waste, the compactor wheel has been a po...


How to select the right compactor wheel for your landfill

Ever since the solid waste industry began using mobile landfill compactors to push, spread and compact waste, the compactor wheel has been a poorly understood but critical component of the machine. Regardless of the manufacturer, the wheel determines the compactor’s core value. Consider the following when selecting a compactor wheel:

Design and construction — Some wheels can trap material between the body of the machine and the inner side-support of the wheel. This buildup can cause premature wear and tear of the inner surface and can allow the inner surface to wear thin enough to lessen its resistance to sharp, heavy objects, or even to collapse. In addition, avoid a wheel that allows material to build up in the centre, which inhibits the ability of the planetary gears to dissipate heat.

Tractive effort — Irregular material, severe slopes and poor weather conditions are common. Compactor wheels must be designed to propel the compactor while pushing a load, regardless of the conditions. The teeth are key to tractive effort. They must penetrate as deep as possible and there must be enough of them to hold the machine on a side slope. Look at the placement, design, configuration and number of teeth to see if they are capable of handling extreme conditions.

Aggressive tooth action — Waste must be broken down to a size that allows it to fit together better. Does the tooth pattern and design help break down the compacted material? The pattern, design and number of teeth can determine if the wheel will do this job effectively.

Wheel cleanliness — Some manufacturers use a self-cleaning design, while others utilize a cleaner bar system. In addition to providing better traction and compaction, a clean, deep-penetrating wheel will bury and impinge paper to keep it from being blown against the fence on windy days.

Overall value — It’s important to consider the particular needs of each site and the type of waste normally encountered. Value is a balance of cost, performance and results. Consider guarantees and warrantees for wear-life but remember that compaction efficiency is very important when determining overall cost.

To ultimately decide which wheel is right for you, insist on a demonstration and ask lots of questions.

Written by Scott Grand, a public relations specialist with the Promersberger Company in Fargo, North Dakota.


Print this page

Related Posts



Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*