Solid Waste & Recycling

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NaPP Data: A Closer Look

General Consumption (1996) Per capita consumption of new packaging decreased to 163 kg/person (from 209 kg/person in 1988). A quarter of all packaging used was comprised of wood pallets, box pallets...


General Consumption (1996)

Per capita consumption of new packaging decreased to 163 kg/person (from 209 kg/person in 1988).

A quarter of all packaging used was comprised of wood pallets, box pallets and other load boards.

The “Brewery Products” sector was the largest packaging consumer — 76 per cent of this packaging was reused.

The “Transportation Equipment” sector was the second largest packaging consumer — 69 per cent of this packaging was reused.

Paper and paperboard packaging consumption decreased by 33 per cent (from 1992).

Post-Consumer Packaging Consumption (1992 to 1996)

The “accommodation, food & beverage, amusement & recreational services” sector increased per capita consumption of new packaging from 1.1 to 3.9 kg/person.

The “retail sector” (not including food, beverxage, drug and tobacco) increased per capita consumption of new packaging from 1.2 to 4.6 kg/person.

Aluminum packaging used for food and beverage containers increased by 62 per cent, from 1.3 to 3.2 kg/person.

Plastic expanded foam (polystyrene) used for packaging increased by 72 per cent, from 0.6 to 1.9 kg/person.

Plastic stoppers, lids, caps and other closures used for packaging increased by 46 per cent, from 0.9 to 1.6 kg/ person.

Paper sacks and bags with a base of less than 40 cm increased by 52 per cent, from 1 to 2 kg/person.

Clear glass containers used for packaging decreased by 40 per cent, from 17 to 10 kg/person.

Reuse (1992 to 1996)

Reuse of packaging consumed increased by 9.2 per cent, from 36.5 to 45.7 per cent.

In 1996, secondary (transport) packaging (wood pallets, box pallets, wood, plastic boxes, cases, crates and large metal. containers) account for 58 per cent of reused packaging.

By 1996, 94 per cent of large (>50 litres) metal containers were reused.

In 1996, 69 per cent of wood pallets and boxes were reused.

Recycling (1992 to 1996)

Recycling of overall packaging increased by 1.7 per cent, from 23 to 24.7 per cent.

The capture rate of aluminum packaging for recycling (after reuse) decreased from 84 to 30 per cent.

The capture rate of paper and paperboard packaging for recycling (after reuse) increased from 51 to 63 per cent.

In 1996, 74 per cent of all recycling activity was post-industrial and 26 per cent was post-consumer packaging (i.e., from households).

In 1996, recycled material from households was comprised of 36 per cent glass, 33 per cent paper and paperboard, 11 per cent metal (non-aluminum), 11 per cent plastic and 8 per cent aluminum.

Disposal (1992 to 1996)

Disposal of all packaging decreased by 10.9 per cent, from 40.5 to 29.6 per cent.

Disposal of paper and paperboard decreased by 49 per cent, from 53 to 26kg/person.

Disposal of aluminum packaging increased by 169 per cent, from 0.01 to 1.6kg/person.

(All statistics were calculated from Environment Canada NaPP data summaries. “1988 Benchmark Estimates Packaging Project” & “1996 National Packaging Survey — Final Results” & “National Packaging Monitoring System 1996 Results.”)


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