Solid Waste & Recycling

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Lumbering Along

Briquetting Systems and Nielsen AG recently installed two BP6000 briquetters into BSL Hardwood Flooring's plant in Quebec. Capacity at this plant is approximately 10,000 tonnes per year. BSL using the...


Briquetting Systems and Nielsen AG recently installed two BP6000 briquetters into BSL Hardwood Flooring’s plant in Quebec. Capacity at this plant is approximately 10,000 tonnes per year. BSL using the machines to produce and market cardboard-packaged fire logs (in packages of six and 12) through major retail centres. The logs were recently featured at the Globe 2006 environmental tradeshow in Vancouver, B.C. Another Nielsen briquetting system will be installed this spring in Muscannell Millworks in Colorado. In that installation, hardwood shavings will be briquetted for commercial fuels as well as for consumer fire logs.

The logs are made from hardwood shavings that are a byproduct of manufacturing flooring. The logs are 3-inch square x section and take up little space in handling. Calorific value of the logs is higher than traditional wood logs and have no chemical binders and additives.

When the materials are destined for commercial fuel applications, a short “hockey puck” shape can be continuously produced. Wood fines and dust — which are difficult to burn in boilers along with traditional hog fuels — can now be burned effectively in briquette form. This is of interest to plywood sander mill operations as well as MDF and HDF flooring producers. Masonite and cardboard residue from door manufacturers have been turned into high value industrial fuels. OSB plants producing fines can now burn this residue with their hog fuels. Bark residue has been successfully briquetted for use as a high density fuel. Density of the briquettes is in the 40 pound per cubic foot range; this reduces handling and transportation costs while maximizing heat value. Most dry wood and biogas-type fuels can be briquetted. Briquetting systems is presently conducting tests for several of the major local lumber producers in Canada and the United States.

Further information, visit www.briquettingsystems.com


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