Solid Waste & Recycling

Feature

Environment and Energy Complex

With construction underway at its landfill-gas-to-energy facility near Drummondville, Quebec, Waste Management (is embarked on building a state-of-the-art complex dedicated to extracting value from waste.


With construction underway at its landfill-gas-to-energy facility near Drummondville, Quebec, Waste Management (is embarked on building a state-of-the-art complex dedicated to extracting value from waste.

The facility will produce electricity using methane gas drawn from a landfill site in the Saint-Nicéphore district of Drummondville. Not only will it generate 7.6 megawatts of electricity annually – enough energy to power the equivalent of 6,500 homes – but the heat produced by the plant’s engines will also be recovered and used to heat a greenhouse complex.

Waste Management will invest $13 million in the electrical power plant, which is expected to become operational in 2012. But that’s just the beginning; it’s part of an even larger project called the Environmental and Energy Complex in Drummondville (EECD).

This advanced waste solutions complex will include an eco-center, a construction and demolition material facility, a new environmentally engineered landfill area and an organics processing facility.

“We’re no longer just a waste collection company,” says Martin Dussault, WM’s Director of Public Affairs in Quebec. “Today across our organization, we manage waste for its resource potential.”

Following a public bidding process, the energy project was selected by Hydro-Québec for its environmental benefits and energy efficiency. The construction of the plant and greenhouse complex is expected to create some 50 jobs in the area.

In addition, the Waste Management has built a school on its property – the Centre for Business Training and Recovery (CBTR) – in partnership with the Des Chênes School Board. The school serves more than 125 students, and as part of its curriculum provides training in the recycling of electronic waste. Some 260 tons of e-waste were recycled last year alone – the equivalent of about 15 semi-trailer trucks filled to capacity.

Guy Crittenden is editor of this magazine. Contact Guy at gcrittenden@solidwastemag.com


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