Solid Waste & Recycling

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City of London mulls natural gas for waste fleet

The city is working with Union Gas to cut a fuel deal and decide on an appropriate refuelling location


Ontario

Ontario’s City of London is joining the province to split the $1.3-million cost of changing its waste management fleet to natural gas as part of an Ontario-wide greenhouse gas challenge.

London’s waste vehicles are currently travelling more than 15,000 kilometres every year using diesel fuel. City council recently discussed a transfer payment agreement from the Ontario Municipal Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Challenge Fund under its fuel-switching component.

The city is working with Union Gas to cut a fuel deal and decide on an appropriate refuelling location.

“We are also actively engaged with the City of London to establish a CNG program for their fleets in London,” Union Gas stated in a report to city council. “CNG as a transportation fuel achieves a minimum reduction of 15% lower CO2 than gasoline or diesel fuels with affordable, return-to-base refuelling options.”

London is currently investigating the economic ins and outs of adopting natural gas for its waste fleet.

Quick Facts

  • Ontario is investing up to $100 million of proceeds from its carbon market in the Municipal GHG Challenge Fund in 2017/18.
  • Municipalities are invited to submit applications for the fund by Nov. 14, 2017. Selected projects will be announced in 2018.
  • Any Ontario municipality with a community-wide greenhouse gas emissions inventory, emissions reduction targets and a strategy to reduce emissions is eligible to apply. Municipalities may request up to $10 million per project.
  • Municipalities with a population of less than 10,000 that do not have a community-wide greenhouse gas emissions inventory, reduction targets and a plan, may be eligible for the Very Small Municipalities Stream. These municipalities are invited to apply using the same application.
  • Ontario will be hosting webinars on the Municipal GHG Challenge Fund in September to help applicants get a better understanding of the program and its requirements.
  • The Climate Change Action Plan and carbon market form the backbone of Ontario’s strategy to cut greenhouse gas pollution to 15 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020, 37 per cent by 2030 and 80 per cent by 2050. The government will report on the plan’s implementation annually and review the plan at least every five years.

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