Solid Waste & Recycling

Feature

Briquetting Helps Recycle Difficult Materials

Vancouver, B.C.-based Briquetting Systems recently unveiled its new small-particulate/dust collection and compaction (briquetting) equipment. The equipment will be of interest to private haulers of waste recyclables, municipalities and private man...


Vancouver, B.C.-based Briquetting Systems recently unveiled its new small-particulate/dust collection and compaction (briquetting) equipment. The equipment will be of interest to private haulers of waste recyclables, municipalities and private manufacturers of paper, wood, metals and plastic products.

Up until now conventional methods of handling plant dust and small particulate generated from woodworking mills, paper mill lines, printing bindery equipment, Styrofoam manufacturers, crumb rubber operations and metals machining companies and other dust/fines generators was limited to one of four methods: bagging, dumpster, put it into conventional baling machinery, or cubing with a dust baler.

Bagging and dumpster results in excessive handling costs due to low bulk densities. Baling dust particulate along with larger pieces results in dust leakage and price reduction by buyers of bales. Using conventional dust balers results in minor densification, leakage and also the use of a bag. All these methods can be best described as “ready for improvement.”

That improvement is now available in the form of the Briquetting Systems’ Dust/Small Particulate Collector and Densifier, available in several capacities and configurations to suit customer requirements. It can be fitted under the discharge of conventional cyclone collectors and is also available with its own dust filter and return-air unit and suction fan. It also can be fed by conveyor or bucket. Dust volume reduction is dramatic (in the order of 10 to 20 times). Briquette size is approximately 2 3/8 inches (60 mm) diameter and 2 to 3 inches long.

For example, typical bulk densities of briquetted paper dust coming from tissue mills and paper bindery equipment is 30 to 40 pounds per cubic foot resulting in a major reduction in handling and disposal costs. Briquetted paper dust has been recycled into end uses such as ceiling tile manufacturing or put back into the paper pulping process. In the case of woodworking mills such as plywood, MDF and LVL mills, dust problems are eliminated and the briquettes can be burned as hog fuel for cogeneration purposes. This compares to inefficient attempts at burning wood dust with conventional hog fuel burners.

The case is the same for furniture and millwork plants. Increasing fossil fuel costs have made the briquetter an attractive investment. Capital payback is typically one year or less depending on the situation. In the case of the Styrofoam industry (such as packaging or sheet insulation manufacturers) briquetted waste EPS (expanded polystyrene) can be compacted to the point where a conventional semi-trailer load can be loaded to its maximum tare weight (usually in the 50,000 pound range). This compares to a semi load of baled Styrofoam weighing only 5,000 pounds.

Briquetters are also available for the metals industry where feedstocks such as machinings from milling and turning equipment are dewatered of cutting fluids, which are reclaimed, while the briquettes are compacted for efficient remelt in foundries.

Crumb rubber operations producing tire wire from grinding up car/truck tires can use the briquetters to compact the tire wire bristles (generated from the tire’s steel belt) to a more efficient form for remelting in foundries. The briquetter is self discharging and will push the briquettes up a 3-inch pipeline to a holding container, roll-off or super sack which can then be fork lifted onto a truck, thus not requiring external exit conveying equipment or additional labor.

In terms of housekeeping, health and safety, dust is removed from the working environment and converted to a dense medium while clean air is returned to the plant.

Contact Wayne Winkler at Briquetting Systems, Vancouver, British Columbia at w.winkler@briquettingsystems.com


Print this page

Related Posts



Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*