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Netherlands Waste Management Themed Trade Mission – Day 4


Today we were in and around the Arnhem area, travelling to Duiven (Doves), Veenendaal and Renkum. We visited a waste to energy facility, cart/underground bin manufacturer and paper recycler. We finished off our day with a group trek into Arnhem’s city centre, culminating with a group dinner in amongst their frenetic shopping spree.

This blog presents some highlights from various site visits and then provides some background information on each place visited.

1. AVR

AVR extract’s green energy from waste and sell the residuals as raw materials. At WTE facilities they supply heat to district heating and generate electricity.

We visited their WTE facility in Duiven (400,000 tpy). This facility supplies heat to local district heating and produces electricity.

They also have a thermal conversion facility (fluidized bed) (200,000 tpy) at this location. It is used to burn off spec recycled paper and other materials (it is first pelletized).

Steam is produced some used by businesses. Steam also run through generators to produce electricity. Metals are recovered from bottom ash. The remaining ash is used for road construction and concrete production.

Some 20 years ago started with district heating (120C) and have been supplying part of Duiven since that time. Looking to connect to district heating in Arnhem. This will start in October 2014. This is replacing old coal and gas fired plants. (In the Netherlands AVR are leaders in district heating).

In 2008 tipping fees for WTE were 120 euros/tonne now it is 50-60 euros. They have had to diversify how revenues are earned. They have focused additional efforts on selling district heat and electricity. District heat is more lucrative than generating electricity (rates going down).

AVR

www.avr.nl

AVR processes the waste from the region and converts this into heat an electricity. The heat is delivered to the local district heating system while the produced electricity is delivered to the national grid. AVR also operates the thermal conversion unit in which they produce cement from paper residue and a composting unit in which several kinds of organic waste is composted.

2. Kliko

Kliko is in the Dutch dictionary and means “dust bin” (i.e. garbage can).

They are a seller of carts. They were the inventor of underground garbage bins. (This is driven by multi residential housing).

They sell across Europe. Currently 65,000 underground containers in Europe, with a  5% increase per year. Residents can access underground bins using RFID cards (The RFID reader is solar powered).

A 5 m3 underground container can be used for 50-75 households (it takes 3 minutes to empty). A full bin weighs about 500-600 kg. They are investigating adding compaction to bins.

Kliko

www.kliko.nl

Kliko is the supplier of several waste collection systems such as: (mini-) waste containers and underground waste containers. Kliko has a large base of customers from municipalities to companies but it also supplies customized waste collection systems to individuals and sport clubs.

3. Parenco

Parenco has been making paper for more than 100 years at this location. They bring in 320,000 tonnes/year of paper for recycling. 85% is post consumer. They make paper used for flyers etc. In the past they also made newsprint but this was discontinued as demand for newsprint decreased in 2007-2008.

Parenco

www.parenco.com/en

The paper mill of Parenco produces paper for magazines and advertising brochures. The raw material originates 100% from recovered paper. The waste stream within Parenco are utilized to the maximum. By burning the waste, sewage sludge and deinking silt released during the production, steam is produced which is used for electricity production and processing of pulp into paper. Heat recovery is used at different stages in the manufacturing process. Parenco is continuously looking for effective and sustainable solutions to contribute to a healthy environment with its own waste water treatment plant and biomass supply to produce green energy.


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