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Ontario Tire Stewardship reaches 50 million tires

Ontarians have embraced tire recycling, helping Ontario Tire Stewardship (OTS) reach the 50 millionth tire milestone in less than four years.


Ontarians have embraced tire recycling, helping Ontario Tire Stewardship (OTS) reach the 50 millionth tire milestone in less than four years.

To put this into perspective, 50 million tires laid side-by-side would cross Canada twice (10,160 km), fill up two Rogers Centres and weigh more than nine Titanic ships.

OTS, which manages the Used Tires Program in Ontario, announced the accomplishment today, asking Ontario residents and businesses to rethink the lifecycle of tires to fulfill its vision to recycle 100 per cent of used tires in Ontario and transform communities with sustainable products made from recycled tires.

“We cannot thank Ontarians enough for embracing this program and keeping tires out of our landfills. Since we launched the Used Tires Program in September 2009, our mission has been to sustainably manage the 12 million tires that enter Ontario annually once they reach their end of life,” said Andrew Horsman, Executive Director of OTS in a statement to media. “From the people who drop off the used tires, to the organizations that collect and move them, straight through to the Ontario companies that turn those tires into innovative new products, this program has focused on rethinking how we look at used tires.”

Since the inception of the program in 2009, OTS has surpassed several important milestones. OTS has:

  • Cleaned up more than 500,000 tires in piles across the province.
  • Stimulated over $40 million of new investment and hundreds of new jobs in the province.
  • Ensured that no Ontario tires are burned or sent to landfills.
  • Injected over $2 million into research and development to develop sustainable next-generation products containing recycled tire rubber.

OTS continues to work with recycled product manufacturers, processors, collectors and haulers across the province to responsibly manage scrap tire waste and bring innovative green products made of recycled tire rubber to market. These products made from recycled tires are becoming more readily available and accepted across the province, and include uses in residential settings such as door mats, carpet underlay, rubber mulch, and patio stones, and in larger building projects as athletic surfacing, playgrounds, sidewalks and roofing.

“Industry has embraced the Used Tires Program and recognizes the benefits of this collaborative approach to managing tires,” said Glenn Maidment, President of the Rubber Association of Canada. “OTS operates a model program that others across the country and around the world can look to emulate.”

Ontario residents can continue to drop off up to four tires for free at any of the 6,900 registered collector sites across the province. For more information on free OTS-registered drop-off locations and innovative tire-derived products, visit www.GreenMyTires.ca.

About Ontario Tire Stewardship

Established in 2009, Ontario Tire Stewardship (OTS) is an Industry Funding Organization (IFO) incorporated under Ontario’s Waste Diversion Act, to implement and operate the Used Tires Program.

At OTS, we are transforming the relationship Ontarians have with the lifecycle of their tires, through a comprehensive approach that takes into account our environment, our economy and our quality of life.  Through the Used Tires program, 100 per cent of Ontario tires get efficiently and responsibly recycled into new products, leading to more livable communities and a growing green economy in this province.

For more information, please visit www.GreenMyTires.ca or follow us @GreenMyTires.

* Assumptions: Average tire width is 205 mm (eight inches); Average tire is about .07 cubic meters; Average weight is 10 kgs (22 lbs).


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