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E-Waste still trashed in Canada: Poll

One in three Canadian respondents say their old electronics are just gathering dust in their homes, while one in 10 admit to throwing e-waste in the garbage, a Samsung Canada poll has found.


One in three Canadian respondents say their old electronics are just gathering dust in their homes, while one in 10 admit to throwing e-waste in the garbage, a Samsung Canada poll has found.

The December 2012 poll suggests that many Canadians simply do not know what to do with their unwanted and outdated electronics, despite the potential for hazardous materials and other end-of-life disposal challenges.

“Almost 10 million Canadians [were] likely to give electronic gifts this [2012] holiday season, but at the same time, we’re seeing that close to the same number of Canadians may not know what to do with old electronics,” Andrew Barrett, VP of marketing for Samsung Canada, said in a December 2012 statement to media.

Samsung operates just one of the many electronics recycling programs available. The Samsung Recycling Direct initiative offers more than 40 year-round e-waste drop-off depots across Canada. In 2012, Samsung says it helped recycle more than 1.3 million pounds of Canadians’ e-waste.

The poll was conducted from December 11 to December 12 of 2012, among 1,004 randomly selected Canadian adults who are Angus Reid Forum panelists. 

Other interesting trends from the poll include:

  • Men were more likely than women to give electronics as gifts this past holiday season (33 per cent of men vs. 24 per cent of women).
  • British Columbia (B.C.) and Alberta residents are most likely to give electronics as gifts (both provinces at 32 per cent vs. 28 per cent national average).
  • Albertans are most likely to store their old e-waste at home (45 per cent vs. 35 per cent national average).
  • Respondents age 18 to 34 were most likely to give electronics as gifts (32 per cent vs. 28 per cent national average) and to store old e-waste at home (54 per cent vs. 35 per cent national average).
  • B.C. residents are most likely to recycle their e-waste (63 per cent vs. 48 per cent national average).

This news item first appeared in EcoLog News. To learn how to subscribe, visit www.ecolog.com


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